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ACADEMICS AND ADMISSION: course descriptions
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course descriptions

Courses are listed numerically preceded by an academic discipline prefix. The LIF courses are followed by ADE courses. Courses are numbered 100-599. Each course number is followed by the course title, a course description, the number of semester credits that the course satisfies and a notice of any prerequisites required.

Under graduate courses numbered 100-299 are lower division (Associate of Science, freshman, sophomore) and 300-499 are upper division (Bachelor of Science, junior, senior).

Graduate courses numbered 500-599 are Master’s level.

ADE 210A&B - Service Dogs
This course teaches basic methods in identifying the needs of people with disabilities to better select, train and place service dogs with a population in need of mobility assistance. Coursework includes personal experience as a "mock" client. Students will be working with dogs of different ages, breeds, personalities and aptitudes, experiencing those with great and not so great potential to become service dogs and learning to distinguish between them. The course also includes conducting client interviews and assessments and client training camps placing trained dogs with individuals with disabilities. 4 credits [1 lecture, 3 lab]

ADE 211 - Hearing Dogs
This course provides the student with basic knowledge and skills related to selecting, training, and placing of hearing dogs with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Information on deafness and hearing impairment is also presented in relation to the client’s circumstances and need for a dog. 1.5 credits [1 lecture, .5 lab]

ADE 212 - Social/Therapy Dogs
This course provides the student with basic knowledge and skills related to selecting, training and utilizing social/therapy dogs in institutions and other settings. Information about differing populations housed in facilities is discussed preparing students to better match individual dog personalities with specific settings. 1.5 credits [1 lecture, .5 lab]

ADE 213 - Guide Dogs
This course provides the student with basic knowledge and skills relating to the selecting, training and placing of guide dogs with individuals who are legally blind or visually impaired. Information on blindness and visual impairments is also presented in relation to the client’s circumstances and need for a guide dog. 1.5 credits [1 lecture, .5 lab]

ADE 240A&B - Disability Studies
The course provides a basic understanding of varying types, causes and resulting limitations of the more prevalent forms of physical disabilities. Clinical signs and progressive stages of specific disabilities are reviewed as well as related terminology and special considerations related to service dog placement. 3 credits

ADE 245 - The Disability Experience
The course provides an overview of the experience of physical disability. It is designed to weave together strands from psychological, sociological, somatic and political perspectives including an exploration of subjective experiences with disabilities. Theoretical models of disability, the history of disability, the various types and causes of disability oppression, disability activism, and emerging disability cultures will be investigated. Students will be given the opportunity to examine their own experiences, perceptions, and beliefs about physical differences. Part of the course involves dialogue with people with disabilities as well as experiential learning through role playing exercises. 1.5 credits

ADE 300 - The History of Modern Assistance Dogs
Students will study the origins of the assistance dog field; types of programs; how programs have formed; growth of the industry; types of tasks dogs performed; clients; issues faced by assistance dog, client and training organization; current status; and trends. 3 credits

ADE 310 - Social Psychology (G.E.)
This course explores the relationship between self and society. Topics include the psycho-physiological and cultural influences, attitudes, values, motivation and interpersonal dynamics. After gaining a more in-depth understanding of these influences, students will learn the methods to enhance their own personal and professional effectiveness. 3 credits

ADE 315 - Health Psychology (G.E.)
This course focuses on the relationship between the mind and the body in physical and psychological well-being. Topics include empirical based mind body research, a review of popular claims and practices, a discussion of strategies students can use to develop their own program of health promotion and maintenance. 3 credits

ADE 405 - Theoretical, Practical, and Ethical Foundations of Assistance Dog Programs
This course focuses on the critical components of assistance dog knowledge, programs, management, innovations and applications including concepts, statements, metaparadigms, philosophies, conceptual models and theories. It explores the ethical, legal and medical issues related to client placements. It explores the role of the client and his or her family, friends, and health care professionals, such as occupational therapists (OT’s), physical therapists (PT’s), psychologists, social workers and other rehab and medical professionals in assistance dog placements. How much is too much infringement into the life of the "buyer" prior to placement or sales? How much information should be sought from the medical individuals working with that individual? What are they legally or morally able to divulge? Where is the balance benefiting the client, dog and program? Assistance dog programs’ client placement practices will be analyzed relative to controlled versus permissive models. 3 credits

ADE 420 - Advanced Disability Studies
The course builds on a basic foundation of disability information – the causes, types and resulting limitations of the more prevalent forms of disabilities. Included will be less prevalent disabilities, expanded information content related to the pathophysiology, variations within each disability category and current treatment and research options. 3 credits.

 

LIF 110 - Introduction to Human/Dog Psychology
This course provides an overview of basic psychological principles and expands to include the similarities between human and dog psychology. Theories of sports psychology that pertain to the acquisition of motor skills applicable to humans and dogs will be explored in depth and the psychology of learning will supplement the curriculum. With attention on research-based behavioral science, students will be provided an opportunity to hone their critical thinking skills in relation to the unique psychological bond between human and dog. 2 credits

LIF 115 - Artistic Representation of the Dog
This course will review masterpieces of dog art in many forms such as photographs, oils, sculptures, and films. But the primary focus of this course is to encourage the student to explore his or her own ability to create an artistic rendering of the dog utilizing various artistic materials from sketches to video. 3 credits

LIF 120 - Introduction to Child-Pup Development
This course provides students with an awareness of the importance of sound early childhood and puppyhood management and training. Emphasis is placed on biological, affective, psychosocial, cognitive and motor skill development. Student training of young pups is a necessary component of the coursework. 1 credit

LIF 125 - Introduction to Operant Conditioning
Operant Conditioning has taken over the field of dog training. Given much credence in recent years, details of its methods and principals are outlined in this course. Investigation of the Skinnerian operant paradigm with emphasis on the four quadrants of operant conditioning include both theoretical and practical examples. The application of systematic desensitization and counter-conditioning for preventing and/or treating phobias in dogs is also covered in depth. 3 credits.

LIF 130A&B - Building Team Dynamics
A forum-like setting in which students are invited to discuss concerns and work out issues in a group of their peers. The need for positive, constructive interactions is stressed leading students to cohesive team collaboration. 1 credit

LIF 150A&B - Canine Health
Taught by a canine medical practitioner, this course is an introduction to basic canine health care. Techniques for examining eyes, ears, mouth, teeth, heart, respiratory systems, skin and neuro-muscular systems are stressed as is preventative medicine. Treatments for minor injuries and other minor medical conditions are discussed. Students take part in dog exams, diagnosis and treatment. These applied exercises help develop the students’ observational and analytical skills. Students taking this course should be more able to determine when a vet visit is required and have appropriate skills in communicating with the vet regarding the condition of the animal. 3 credits

LIF 155 - Human Benefits of Dog Ownership
This course focuses on documented and anecdotal physical, psychological and health benefits of dog ownership. In the past quarter of a century, the dogs’ role has become increasingly one of an intimate family member and friend. Studies have shown that having a dog, touching a dog and communicating with a dog reduces anger, increases life spans and adds to the quality of life. These and other benefits of canine companionship will be explored in depth. 2 credits

LIF 160 - The Human-Canine Body Mechanism
This course, team-taught by human and canine medical practitioners, is an introduction to the human and canine’s body mechanisms and related functions. Anatomy, kinesiology, physiology, and immunology are presented in conjunction with body mechanics. The physics of human and canine sporting and working roles related to body mechanics is included. Knowledge of this material will enable students to analyze and evaluate human and canine capabilities in relation to a physical design. 1 credit

LIF 165 - Human-Canine Aging & Grieving
Team taught by human and canine medical practitioners, this course traces the biology of the aging process in both dogs and humans, contrasting and comparing the processes of each. From the theories of aging, through the effects on body structure, composition and functions, aging changes and dysfunctions will be explored. The importance of genetics versus good health care will be reviewed. The grieving portion of the course presents the pioneering research into the grieving process by Elizabeth Kubler Ross and others, while expanding it to include grieving for non-human loved ones and the sociological and psychological issues involved. An important and growing field in psychology, grieving is a critical part of facing and adjusting to the loss of an important being in one’s life. Understanding this process helps you and those you know handle difficult times. 1.5 credits

LIF 170A&B - Breeding, Birthing and Whelping
This course focuses on actual breeding techniques and breeding issues of dogs and expands rapidly into human birthing and dog whelping similarities and differences. The course also includes information on the similarities and differences related to the care of the newborn child and pups and new mom. Whenever possible, students will assist in a breeding and a whelping. 1 credit

LIF 181 - Human and Canine Families
A wealth of research abounds about human family dynamics. These studies are used as the basis for a study of similar dynamics in the canine family, their sibling relationships, and parent-sibling hierarchies. Another dimension, the canine as a sibling in its adopted human family unit will also be examined. 3 credits

LIF 190A&B - Motor Skill Learning I (lecture/lab)
This course, for first year students entering as freshmen, provides an overview of the theories in sports psychology and physiology that pertain to the acquisition of motor skills that apply to humans and dogs alike. These theories are put into practice in the laboratory component of this course as the students develop motor skills pertaining to their own physical movements relative to dog training while simultaneously teaching dogs of differing ages and breeds specific motor skills in relation to their anticipated professional or social roles. 6 credits [2 lecture, 4 lab]
  Prerequisite/Co-requisite: LIF 110 - Introduction to Human/Dog Psychology

LIF 192A&B - Environmental Management I
This course (for first year students) teaches the basics in managing an environment in which dogs and humans coexist for their mutual benefit. Containment systems [pros and cons of kennel versus yard containment], clean-up, sanitation and issues related to waste disposal requirements along with general health and safety concerns applicable to the home, business or kennel environment, including toy safety, are explored. Boarding kennel versus dog day care and other care-giving approaches are discussed. 1.5 credits [.5 lecture, 1 lab]

LIF 200 - History of Emerging Human-Dog Culture
This course provides an overview of the history of the human-dog relationship from the archeological findings of human’s first contact with the canid, through speculations about their evolving association, to the dog’s current forms, shapes, colors, and instinctive orientations as molded by humans. The human’s current form, shape and orientation as molded by the dog will also be explored. The societal needs of humans combined with the amazing genetic plasticity of the dog results in over 400 breeds of dog worldwide. This process of domesticating the dog to fit the diverse roles required by human society’s needs and desires is explored through modern times. 1.5 credits

LIF 220 - History of Dog Training
This course reviews the written and pictorial history of dog training from initial publications to the most current. Historical accounts of humankind’s many uses of dogs will help students understand parallels between our relationship with dogs and our training methodology. Cultural and personal variables that influence the ways we train dogs are examined. 2 credits

LIF 230 - Modern Human-Canine Partnerships
An exploration of the many and diverse activities humans engage in with a canine partner. From hunting of old, to Scott and Ginsburg’s revolutionary study on human learning conducted with dogs, to cancer melanoma-sniffing dogs, the canine’s value to its human partner is growing and expanding in several directions. The student will leave with a much greater appreciation for the abilities and use of the canine, equipped to expand and grow those unique capabilities in more diverse and useful directions. 2.5 credits [1 lecture 1.5 lab]

LIF 240A&B - The Obedient Dog
Over six million dogs are euthanized each year. Many others land in county shelters and humane societies - a result of improper upbringing or the owners’ lack of handling knowledge. Qualified dog trainers and obedience instructors skilled not just in dog training, but educating people, are in great demand. This course focuses on teaching the student both how to train dogs, and how to apply those same techniques to running obedience classes and conducting training sessions for individual dog owners. 4 credits [1 lecture, 3 lab]

LIF 250 - The Business of Dogs
This course helps prepare students for the business side of any dog-related endeavor. Accounting, filing, office management, insurance, business plans, legal issues, corporate status and boards of directors are all discussed and explored relative to each student’s goals. 1.5 credits

LIF 260 - Dog Law
Explores the legal issues surrounding dog ownership in this country and around the world. Students will critically compare canine-related systems of law in multiple countries. Particular attention will be paid to existing US law. Students will be asked to examine the completeness, efficacy, enforceability and consequences of current US dog-related law. The intended and unintended effects of proposed new dog laws, such as breed-specific legislation, will also be explored. The relevance of this course stretches into all corners of students’ everyday life with dogs. 1.5 credits

LIF 270 - Public Relations with a Dog
This course focuses on the techniques necessary to create, maintain and expand on a positive public image of your organization. Methods of working with various media such as newspaper, magazines, television, radio, and public appearances are explored in detail. The student will develop a media relations plan and research contacts and opportunities to network with the gatekeepers of public relations venues. Emphasis is put on “branding” with a definitive, exemplary and memorable image. 1 credit

LIF 275 - Marketing the Dog
This introductory course combines marketing strategy, concepts and tactics to equip the student with a strong grasp of marketing theory and practice both as a consumer and as a practitioner. 1 credit

LIF 280 - Sales and Fundraising for the Dog
Students will acquire skills relevant to raising funds for assistance dog programs as well as to effectively sell a full range of products and services that dog programs can provide. Students will learn and practice techniques to focus public attention on their programs, build constituencies, secure donated funds, set appropriate prices and sell products and services. 1 credit

LIF 285 - Finding Your Income Niche
Seeking a business niche that is both enjoyable and lucrative requires insight into oneself as well as careful analysis of the business climate. The dog industry has grown from a million to a billion dollar industry in the last 30 years. Dog daycare centers are springing up everywhere as are dog walking businesses. Pet and hunting dog training remains the backbone of the industry, but recreational uses of the dog are taking front and center stage. This course incorporates a cost/benefit analysis while taking individual personalities into consideration with the goal of helping the student define a business direction for him/herself. 1 credit

LIF 290A&B - Motor Skill Learning II (lecture/lab)
Through this course, second year students continue to build on a knowledge of theoretical sports psychology and physiology foundation as it relates to the acquisition of human and canine motor skills. The Laboratory component similarly builds on acquired student motor skill competencies gained the previous year. Instruction at this level is based on on-going assessments of each student’s growth, which serves as a basis for individualized instruction. Further experience teaching diverse motor skills to dogs of varying ages and breeds continues to provide new opportunities for improving student capabilities in teaching canine motor skills. 5 credits [1 lecture, 4 lab]

LIF 292A&B - Environmental Management II
This course (for second year students) expands on the methods used in managing a dog’s environment. Containment systems, clean-up, sanitation and issues related to waste disposal requirements along with general health and safety concerns applicable to the home, business or kennel environment, including toy safety, are explored in more depth. Boarding kennel versus dog day care and other care-giving approaches are researched. 1.5 credits [.5 lecture, 1 lab]

LIF 305 - Study of Modern Dog Breeds
This course studies the history, diversity, instincts, purpose, and problems associated with individual and groups of modern dog breeds. 3 credits

LIF 310 - Selection & Breeding Strategies for Success
Breeding is fundamental to many dog programs. Less known is how to create a sound, long range breeding strategy that will meet the present and future needs of the program. DNA analysis has changed some of the approaches to breeding. This course explores theories in breeding approaches that have proven track records in their respective arenas. 3 credits

LIF 315 - Dog Products and the Changing Climate
Students will research, analyze, and design products used to exercise, train, manage, and work with dogs. The variety of contexts and perspectives of the use of dog products will be examined. 3 credits

LIF 320 - Exploring Dog Business Careers & Management Needs
Students will explore the range of business careers available in dog-related business and examine the management needs of each type of career. 3 credits

LIF 325 - Computer Systems and Database Management (G.E.)
Students will learn how computer systems and software applications, including database management systems, may be used to meet the needs of a business or nonprofit organization. 2 credits

LIF 330 - Human-Canine Nutrition
The digestive anatomy of dogs and humans is studied along with a review of commercial dog foods. A design for feeding programs for dogs of various ages and in various working or pet roles is discussed. 3 credits

LIF 345 - History of the Development of Dog Laws
Students will study the development of laws related to dogs, including the rationale behind the laws. 3 credits

LIF 350 - Dogs in Art
Students will examine the representation of dogs in all forms of art, from early cave drawings to classical sculpture to modern illustrations. 3 credits

LIF 355 - Comparison of Human-Canine Personalities, Emotionality and Socialization Processes within the Family
This course will provide a look at human and canine personality models and birth order theories and how they fit within the family model. 3 credits

LIF 360 - Behavioral Ecology of Predators and Prey
Students will learn about the social and foraging behavior of predatory animals, anti-predator strategies of prey species and co-evolution of predators and prey. 3 credits

LIF 375 - The History of Modern Recreational and Working Dogs
Students will study the origins of the recreational and working dog fields; types of programs; how programs have formed; growth of the industry; types of tasks dogs performed; owners and handlers; issues faced by recreational and working dog, owner and handler, and training organization; current status; and trends. 3 credits

LIF 390 A&B - Motor Skill Learning III (lec./lab)
Third year students utilize their understanding of canine learning and motor skill acquisition to further advance their knowledge base. Information from a variety of academic disciplines such as biology, ethology and psychology helps create a more complete and integrated level of student understanding. The Laboratory portion of this course provides students with new opportunities to reinforce their abilities to teach canine motor skills as well as to facilitate skill development of less-advanced students. An emphasis is placed on student self-assessment of appropriate physical movements, voice and body postures relating to observed dog behavior. 6 credits [2 lecture, 4 lab]

LIF 400 - Advanced Sales, Fundraising and Marketing Strategies
Marketing techniques and sales and fundraising strategies get old as the public habituates to them. What is needed now to focus the spotlight on your program and to gain the confidence of the public to donate or purchase your product or service? This course presents the newest, most dynamic methods for today’s audience. 3 credits

LIF 415 - Advanced Environmental Management
Students will research the newest, most up-to-date methods to establish and maintain an environment in which dogs and humans coexist for their mutual benefit. Visits to a variety of kennel settings will form the backdrop of this course. The requirements and considerations for creating and managing safe, healthy, and enriching environments in the home, kennel and business will be explored. 3 credits

LIF 420 - Advanced Breeding, Whelping & Care
Focusing on the medical aspects of breeding, whelping and care, this course provides information that addresses potential problems and difficulties in breeding, whelping and care. 3 credits

LIF 430 - Human and Canine Language Compared
This course explores human body, facial movements, and involuntary utterances relative to their meaning in the United States culture (and to a lesser extent in other cultures). Similarly, the facial and body language along with vocalizations of dogs will be examined. Comparing and contrasting these language methods of the human and the dog will be the primary focus of this course. 3 credits

LIF 440 - Research and the Dog
This course provides an introduction to quantitative, qualitative, clinical, historical and philosophical research that has been done on the dog. Identification of obvious research needing to be done, questions not yet answered, and issues remaining to be resolved will also be explored. Students will be required to undertake projects to help define and clarify shortfalls in dog research, theorizing why this research remains undone. 3 credits

LIF 445 - The Dog in Modern Literature
Students will study the portrayal and influence of dogs in modern literature, including books, magazines, plays and films. The literature studied will represent several countries and will be targeted to audiences of all ages. 3 credits

LIF 450 - Genetic versus Environmental Causes and Solutions
The influences of genetic and environmental causes of physical and behavioral issues and their solutions will be contrasted and compared. The course will include the study of genetic markers and pedigrees. 3 credits

LIF 455 - Theoretical, Practical, & Ethical Issues of Dog-Human Recreational and Work Activities
This course focuses on the critical components of recreational and working dog knowledge, programs, management, innovations, and applications including concepts, statements, metaparadigms, philosophies, conceptual models and theories. It explores the ethical, legal and medical issues related to the owner or handler placements. It explores the role of the owner or handler and his or her family, friends and human service professionals, such as firefighters, police officers, search and rescue workers, customs agents and other professionals in recreational and working dog placements. How much is too much infringement into the life of the owner or handler prior to placement? How much information should be sought from the professionals working with that individual? What are they legally or morally able to divulge? Where is the balance benefiting the owner or handler, dog and program? 3 credits

LIF 460 - Cynomorphic Perspective
A psychological and philosophical review that answers, as best we can, the following questions: 1) What do dogs know, think and believe? 2) How is canine consciousness similar and different from human consciousness? 3) What is the role of nature and nurture in shaping canine cognitive capacity? 4) Is a dog capable of moral agency? 5) What does it mean to hold a dog morally responsible? 3 credits

LIF 490A&B - Motor Skill Learning IV (lecture/lab)
Designed for fourth year students, this course facilitates an advanced integration of motor skill knowledge and practical application. A thorough understanding of how motor skills in both humans and dogs are acquired and maintained leads to greater student skills. In the Laboratory component, previous knowledge and experience provides students with the confidence and capability to handle a wide variety of dogs and teach them advanced motor skills. Opportunities to progress to even higher levels of motor skill competency are provided. 6 credits [2 lecture, 4 lab]

LIF 505 - The Emotional Lives of Dogs and Other Animals
Students will study the evolution of animal emotions in a wide variety of animals, but will focus on dogs and their wild relatives, especially coyotes and wolves. The focus will show that the emotional lives of dogs and other animals are public affairs and that it is misleading to talk about the hidden or private lives of animals as if humans can not learn a lot about what they are feeling and thinking. Students will read a good deal of general material about animal emotions and will learn about evolutionary biology and ethology. The course will also teach how scientific data (or what is called science sense) meshes with common sense and intuition. Current and historical views will be explored and discussed in depth. 3 credits

LIF 510 - Introduction to Scholarly Inquiry and Research or Culminating Project
This course focuses on the construction of a research instrument or culminating project and investigating its measurement properties (validity and reliability). This measurement will be linked to qualitative measures and quantitative observations and will be discussed in a variety of contexts: interviewing, standardized testing or performance assessment. Students will examine the development of knowledge frameworks, and what shapes them; the purpose of such frameworks as they impact decision-making; a review of issues and research in assistance dogs (service, hearing, guide, social/ therapy) and other ways dogs help or are involved with people. 3 credits

LIF 515 - Human-Canine Cognition and Communication Compared
A functional comparison of the thinking and communication of humans and canines will be studied in light of evolution, genetics, brain systems and neurobiology as well as through behavioral data. Cognitive topics will include aspects of sensation and perception, intelligence, problem solving and consciousness as well as learning and memory. Topics in communication will include social and em tional signaling in addition to information transmission. 3 credits

LIF 520 - Ethical, Moral and Legal Perspectives of Canine Training, Use and Ownership
This course focuses on the ethical, moral and legal issues related to dogs. What types of training are permissible? What is a fair and reasonable training methodology? Who believes what? What behaviors or tasks can be reasonably expected of a dog? Who owns the dog? What can be done to retrieve a dog sold to an abusive person or one who does not use the dog for his intended purpose? Should a dog be forced or encouraged to work? How can it be determined if the work is unsuitable? Are there laws that protect the owner, the seller, and the dog? Students will hear prevailing views from a variety of sources. 3 credits

LIF 525 - Canine Behavioral Problems:Symptoms & Treatments
Dogs, whether assistance or working dogs or simply companion dogs, can suffer from a number of behavioral problems that make them difficult to live or work with. This course will address the most common of these problems, including aggression (fearful and dominance related towards dogs and humans) and fear-based difficulties (phobias, social fears, and separation anxiety), and some of the less common but still disruptive issues, such as obsessive compulsive and repetitive behavioral problems. It will include instruction on how to diagnose and assess these difficulties and approaches to correcting them. It will also provide information on how to recognize age-related complications, such as diminished sensory capacity. 3 credits

LIF 535 - Evolution and Innovations in Dog-Human Partnerships
The course will trace history’s best guess of the earliest dog-human partnerships and continue through subsequent eras and locales throughout the world and into the modern-day. It will exame the dog's roles and functions in these various cultures and historical periods and also consider the various attitudes and perceptions that people have had toward dogs. This historical review should broaden and deepen the student's understanding as to how dogs fit into human societies and allow them explore and potentially identify new and innovative roles in which the dog might improve the lives of humankind. The students will be expected to identify what can be learned, what can be applied, and which beliefs are necessary to discard in order to maximize human use of canine capabilities.3 credits

LIF 540A&B - Theories of Canine and Human Learning
An exploration of theories of both human and canine learning, this course will investigate multiple views, ranging from classical to operant to modern beliefs related to the brain and its mechanisms for thought and memory. Taught by individuals foremost in their fields, this dynamic course will challenge students to look beyond their current beliefs to explore and test old and new theories. A dog will be required for the laboratory coursework. 6 credits

LIF 550 - Analysis and Design of Human-Canine Training Programs
This course provides an overview of and practice in applying child, adult and dog learning theory to the design training program curricula. Several models of training program design, learning theory and instructional strategies are currently in practice and emerging. By surveying, studying, and working with a range of models, students will learn how to select appropriate approaches for a given set of training needs. 3 credits

LIF 565 - Behavioral Ecology of Predators and Prey
Students will learn about the social and foraging behavior of predatory animals, anti-predator strategies of prey species and co-evolution of predators and prey. 3 credits

LIF 570 - Advances in Canine Health and Well-Being
This course focuses on the newest theories and practices in canine health, including what is on the horizon. Group environments, physical and psychological issues and solutions will be discussed together with the most advanced medical procedures and practices encouraging canine health and longevity. 3 credits

LIF 580 - Canine Behavioral Problems: Symptoms and Treatments
Dogs, whether working service dogs simply companion dogs, can suffer from a number of behavioral problems that make them difficult to live or work with. This course will address the most common of these problems, including aggression (fearful and dominance related towards dogs and humans) and fear-based difficulties (phobias, social fears, and separation anxiety), and some of the less common but still disruptive issues, such as obsessive compulsive and repetitive behavioral problems. It will include instruction on how to diagnose and assess these difficulties and approaches to correcting them. It will also provide information on how to recognize age-related complications, such as diminished sensory capacity. 3 credits

LIF 590 - Thesis/Culminating Project
This course allows students to integrate their knowledge of and experiences with dogs and dogs’ roles and relationships with people that address problems of concern. The student will contribute to the body of knowledge with their researched thesis or culminating project and its supported conclusions. Prerequisite: LIF 510. 3 credits